Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBurdfield-Steel, Emily
dc.contributor.authorAuty, Sam
dc.contributor.authorShuker, David M.
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-26T11:31:11Z
dc.date.available2015-10-26T11:31:11Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationBurdfield-Steel, E., Auty, S., & Shuker, D. (2015). Do the benefits of polyandry scale with outbreeding?. <em>Behavioral Ecology</em>, 26 (5), 1423-1431. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arv103">doi:10.1093/beheco/arv103</a>
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_67249
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/47427
dc.description.abstractThere have been many potential explanations put forward as to why polyandry often persists despite the multiple costs it can inflict on females. One such explanation is avoidance of costs associated with mating with genetically incompatible males. Genetic incompatibility can be thought of as a spectrum from individuals that are genetically too similar (inbreeding) to those that are too dissimilar (outbreeding or hybridization). Here we look for evidence that the level of outbreeding influences the benefits of polyandry in the seed bug Lygaeus equestris. Our system allows us to test for benefits of polyandry at levels of genetic similarity ranging from full siblings to heterospecifics, both in terms of egg production and hatching success. We found that while outbreeding level appeared to have no effect on fitness for intraspecific matings, and polyandry did not appear to result in any increase in fertility or fecundity, hybridization with a closely related species, Lygaeus simulans, carried considerable fitness costs. However, these costs could be rescued with a single mating to a conspecific. Thus, polyandry may be beneficial in populations that co-occur with closely related species and where there is reproductive interference. However, within-species genetic incompatibility is unlikely to be the driving force behind polyandry in this species. Furthermore, the mechanism underlying this rescue of fertility remains unclear as manipulation of male cuticular hydrocarbon profile, a possible mechanism by which females can assess male identity, had no effect on female offspring production.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherOxford University Press; International Society for Behavioral Ecology
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBehavioral Ecology
dc.subject.othergenetic compatability
dc.subject.otherpolyandry
dc.subject.otherreproductive interference
dc.subject.othersexual selection
dc.titleDo the benefits of polyandry scale with outbreeding?
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201510133363
dc.contributor.laitosBio- ja ympäristötieteiden laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosThe Department of Biological and Environmental Scienceen
dc.contributor.oppiaineEkologia ja evoluutiobiologia
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2015-10-13T12:15:08Z
dc.type.coarjournal article
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange1423-1431
dc.relation.issn1045-2249
dc.relation.volume26
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Society for Behavioral Ecology. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.rights.urlhttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.relation.doi10.1093/beheco/arv103


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the
International Society for Behavioral Ecology. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Society for Behavioral Ecology. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.