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dc.contributor.authorMökkönen, Mikael
dc.contributor.authorCrespi, Bernard J.
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-28T09:49:14Z
dc.date.available2015-04-28T09:49:14Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationMökkönen, M., & Crespi, B. J. (2015). Genomic conflicts and sexual antagonism in human health: Insights from oxytocin and testosterone. <i>Evolutionary Applications</i>, <i>8</i>(4), 307-325. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1111/eva.12244" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1111/eva.12244</a>
dc.identifier.otherCONVID_24677509
dc.identifier.otherTUTKAID_65977
dc.identifier.urihttps://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/45727
dc.description.abstractWe review the hypothesized and observed effects of two of the major forms of genomic conflicts, genomic imprinting and sexual antagonism, on human health. We focus on phenotypes mediated by peptide and steroid hormones (especially oxytocin and testosterone) because such hormones centrally mediate patterns of physical and behavioral resource allocation that underlie both forms of conflict. In early development, a suite of imprinted genes modulates the human oxytocinergic system as predicted from theory, with paternally inherited gene expression associated with higher oxytocin production, and increased solicitation to mothers by infants. This system is predicted to impact health through the incompatibility of paternal-gene and maternal-gene optima and increased vulnerability of imprinted gene systems to genetic and epigenetic changes. Early alterations to oxytocinergic systems have long-term negative impacts on human psychological health, especially through their effects on attachment and social behavior. In contrast to genomic imprinting, which generates maladaptation along an axis of mother–infant attachment, sexual antagonism is predicted from theory to generate maladaptation along an axis of sexual dimorphism, modulated by steroid and peptide hormones. We describe evidence of sexual antagonism from studies of humans and other animals, demonstrating that sexually antagonistic effects on sex-dimorphic phenotypes, including aspects of immunity, life history, psychology, and behavior, are commonly observed and lead to forms of maladaptation that are demonstrated, or expected, to impact human health. Recent epidemiological and psychiatric studies of schizophrenia in particular indicate that it is mediated, in part, by sexually antagonistic alleles. The primary implication of this review is that data collection focused on (i) effects of imprinted genes that modulate the oxytocin system, and (ii) effects of sexually antagonistic alleles on sexdimorphic, disease-related phenotypes will lead to novel insights into both human health and the evolutionary dynamics of genomic conflicts.fi
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEvolutionary Applications
dc.subject.othergenomic imprinting
dc.subject.otherkinship theory
dc.subject.otherparental antagonism
dc.subject.otherparent–offspring conflict
dc.subject.othersexual antagonism
dc.subject.othersexual conflict
dc.titleGenomic conflicts and sexual antagonism in human health: Insights from oxytocin and testosterone
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:jyu-201504281685
dc.contributor.laitosBio- ja ympäristötieteiden laitosfi
dc.contributor.laitosDepartment of Biological and Environmental Scienceen
dc.contributor.oppiaineEkologia ja evoluutiobiologiafi
dc.contributor.oppiaineEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.date.updated2015-04-28T09:15:04Z
dc.type.coarjournal article
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange307-325
dc.relation.issn1752-4563
dc.relation.numberinseries4
dc.relation.volume8
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.rights.copyright© 2015 The Authors. Evolutionary Applications published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessfi
dc.rights.urlhttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.relation.doi10.1111/eva.12244


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© 2015 The Authors. Evolutionary Applications published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative
Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided
the original work is properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2015 The Authors. Evolutionary Applications published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.