Physical activity history and end-of-life hospital and long-term care

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author von Bonsdorff, Mikaela
dc.contributor.author Rantanen, Taina
dc.contributor.author Leinonen, Raija
dc.contributor.author Kujala, Urho
dc.contributor.author Törmäkangas, Timo
dc.contributor.author Mänty, Minna
dc.contributor.author Heikkinen, Eino
dc.date.accessioned 2012-07-10T08:55:43Z
dc.date.available 2012-07-10T08:55:43Z
dc.date.issued 2009
dc.identifier.citation von Bonsdorff, M., Rantanen, T., Leinonen, R., Kujala, U., Törmäkangas, T., Mänty, M., & Heikkinen, E. (2009). Physical activity history and end-of-life hospital and long-term care. Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences, 64A (7), 778-784.
dc.identifier.issn 1079-5006
dc.identifier.other TUTKAID_37473
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/38175
dc.description.abstract Background: Little is known about the early predictors of need for care in late life. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether physical activity from midlife onward was associated with hospital and long-term care in the last year of life. Methods: We studied a decedent population of 846 persons aged 66–98 years at death, who, on average 5.8 years prior to death, had participated in an interview about their current and earlier physical activity. Data on the use of care in the last year of life are register-based data and complete. Results: Men needed on average 96 days (SD 7.0) and women 138 days (SD 6.2) of inpatient care in the last year of life. Among men, the risk for all-cause hospital care in the last year of life was higher for those who had been sedentary since midlife (adjusted incidence rate ratio [IRR] 1.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14–3.42) compared with those who had been consistently physically active, whereas use of long-term care did not correlate with physical activity history. Among women, the risk for long-term care was higher for those who had been sedentary (IRR 2.03, 95% CI 1.28–3.21) or only occasionally physically active (IRR 1.60, 95% CI 1.06–2.43), than for those who had been consistently active from midlife onward, whereas use of hospital care did not correlate with physical activity history. Conclusion: People who had been physically active since midlife needed less end-of-life inpatient care but patterns differed between men and women.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Gerontological Society of America; Oxford University Press
dc.relation.ispartof Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences
dc.rights © The Author 2009. This is an author's final draft version of an article whose final and definitive form has been published in The Journal of Gerontology, Series A. by Gerontological Society of America and Oxford University Press.
dc.subject.other fyysinen aktiivisuus fi
dc.subject.other sairaalahoito fi
dc.subject.other laitoshoito fi
dc.subject.other ikääntyneet henkilöt fi
dc.subject.other physical activity en
dc.subject.other hospital care en
dc.subject.other long-term care en
dc.subject.other aged en
dc.title Physical activity history and end-of-life hospital and long-term care
dc.type Article en
dc.identifier.urn URN:NBN:fi:jyu-201207102037
dc.contributor.laitos Department of Health Sciences en
dc.contributor.laitos Terveystieteiden laitos fi
dc.contributor.oppiaine gerontologia ja kansanterveys fi
jyx.tutka.volyme 64A
jyx.tutka.mnumber 7
jyx.tutka.pagetopage 778-784
dc.type.uri http://purl.org/eprint/type/SubmittedJournalArticle
dc.identifier.doi doi:10.1093/gerona/glp029
dc.date.updated 2012-07-10T03:30:19Z
dc.description.version Author's Final draft
eprint.status http://purl.org/eprint/type/status/PeerReviewed

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record