Darwin and Ethics : Using Natural Selection to Understand Ethical Business and Organizational Behavior

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dc.contributor.author Daly, Shawn P.
dc.contributor.author Mattila, Minna Marita
dc.date.accessioned 2010-10-01T10:01:51Z
dc.date.available 2010-10-01T10:01:51Z
dc.date.issued 2000
dc.identifier.citation Daly, S. P. & Mattila, M. M. (2000). Darwin and Ethics : Using Natural Selection to Understand Ethical Business and Organizational Behavior. EJBO - Electronic Journal of Business Ethics and Organization Studies, Vol. 5 (1). Retrieved from http://ejbo.jyu.fi
dc.identifier.issn 1239-2685
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/25327
dc.description.abstract The origins of ethics and morality have been considered for many, many years. From ancient Greek metaphysicians to the great theologians of the Middle Ages to modern philosophers, different systematic frameworks have been developed to understand how and why ethics are formed. These frameworks provide people and organizations with guidance about how to act toward other humans and institutions in their environment. Steiner and Steiner (1991) discuss six different primary sources for understanding the development of ethics: religious, philosophical, cultural, legal, codes of conduct, and genetics (see Table). Of these six systems, the genetic framework is clearly the least developed, least explored, and least utilized. This is especially true in terms of understanding ethical behavior of modern business people and organizations. Thus, the purpose of this article is to examine the genetic (Darwinian) paradigm of ethical behavior in more detail. To do this, we will present a brief history of how the biological sciences and evolutionary thought has formulated a coherent view of the development of an ethical code of conduct. Next, the most recent development in this research stream – evolutionary psychology and social exchange – is used to connect the natural selection paradigm to the realm of business ethics and behavior. Empirical support and behavioral examples are given in both the areas of inter-personal and inter-organizational ethics. en
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Business and Organization Ethics Network (BON)
dc.relation.ispartofseries EJBO - Electronic Journal of Business Ethics and Organization Studies
dc.relation.uri http://ejbo.jyu.fi
dc.subject.other Darwin en
dc.subject.other darwinismi en
dc.subject.other etiikka en
dc.subject.other luonnonvalinta en
dc.subject.other liike-elämä en
dc.subject.other organisaatiokäyttäytyminen en
dc.title Darwin and Ethics : Using Natural Selection to Understand Ethical Business and Organizational Behavior
dc.type Article en
dc.identifier.urn URN:NBN:fi:jyu-201010012839

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